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RE: Can I develop iPhone applications using Java?
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RE: Can I develop iPhone applications using Java?




Please see my comments below.
Rob
----------------------------------------
> From: email@hidden
> To: email@hidden
> Date: Thu, 25 Jun 2009 15:29:52 -0400
> CC: email@hidden; email@hidden; email@hidden
> Subject: Re: Can I develop iPhone applications using Java?
>
> On 25 Jun 2009, at 14:53, Rob Ross wrote:
>
>> Well, there's something like 7 million active Java developers and
>> around 300,000 Cocoa developers. That might be a reason to support
>> Java on the iPhone.
>
> [irony-on]because the iPhone suffers such a horrible lack of
> applications[irony-off]
>
> Developers go where the market is, in the end they are in it for the
> money.
> They use the tool that gets them to the money pile.
> Besides, ObjC is the better language anyway, and unlike the desktop
> environment, there's nothing portable about an iPhone app, and the
> last thing that Jobs or any iPhone user would want to see is ported
> apps or portable apps with crummy non-native user interfaces.

I agree that it looks like Apple would like to "Lock-in" and control iPhone developers.  A great way to do that is with non-portable code and a draconian iPhone SDK License Agreement.  (As noted in the press, the terms of the SDK are have been getting better over time).  In my view, consumers will likely be hurt the most since they will likely have to pay higher prices for iPhone Software (since it is not easily portable to other phones).  Developers have to recoup their costs somewhere.
And yes, Java on the iPhone (unless running in a browser)  would not make much sense unless special UI classes were added (but then the code would not be that portable again!).  A Java app that could not take advantage of the touch screen and all the fancy gestures would pretty much useless.
But to Apple's credit, they are made available a very good and FREE SDK for the iPhone.  If you are a C, C++ or Java developer, learning objective-c is not that hard.

> Besides Java (and Flash) can't be easily controlled by the OS, instead
> they act like an OS within the OS. And as such, they can suck up
> virtually unlimited resources, both in memory and CPU time when people
> who barely understand "Learn Java in 24h in a Nutshell for
> Dummies" (or even worse "Learn Flash in 24h in a Nutshell for
> Dummies") perpetrate their code upon the public.
This is an exaggeration.  Objective-C programs are just as susceptible (if not more susceptible) to memory leaks and "sucking up resources".
But Java programs are often slower since they essentially run in a virtual layer, called the JVM.  But there are some Java compilers that will compile the Java source code to machine code.  This code often runs just as fast an C, C++ or Objective C code.
> Why is it, that Safari with a few windows open, all miniaturized to
> the Dock and nothing else happening can eat up 80% or more of CPU time
> and have the fans on my MacBook Pro going at high speed? Because
> ridiculous Java and Flash code is running in the various browser
> windows.
> Unfortunately Safari still doesn't support a "block all Flash and Java
> except on the few sites I specifically allow it" option. Unfortunately
> some (thankfully ever fewer) of the CC and banking sites require Flash
> and/or Java.
> Flash, thanks to a variety of third party blockers is now more or less
> permanently banned...
>
> If there's one thing I'm thankful for is that Java and Flash are NOT
> present on the iPhone. It would run the battery down, invite on
> average even worse coders, ruin the user experience, and help
> proliferate these two plagues on the computer industry.
Many people would argue that the lack of flash is ruining the user experience since users cannot watch Flash videos on very popular sites like YouTube.
I suspect that Apple is refusing to put Flash on the iPhone for other reasons (than "ruining user experience").  Maybe they want too push their own video format or maybe Apple is using this as leverage against Adobe in other negotiations.
You appear to be assuming that iPhone / Objective-c developers are typically better coders than Java coders.  I see no evidence of that.  There are some pretty bad iPhone / objective-c developers out there.
>
> Unfortunately Java has itself entrenched enough in certain markets
> that it's here to stay like its predecessor Cobol, but anyone who puts
> up a wall against the spread of the two earns cudos in my book.
I would not say COBOL is the predecessor of Java.  Java is heavily based on C and C++ (just like Objective-C)..
It makes me wonder why you are subscriber to this list if you hate Java so much.
>
> Ronald
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References: 
 >Can I develop iPhone applications using Java? (From: Jonathan Chac√≥n <email@hidden>)
 >Re: Can I develop iPhone applications using Java? (From: Rob Ross <email@hidden>)
 >Re: Can I develop iPhone applications using Java? (From: Shawn Erickson <email@hidden>)
 >Re: Can I develop iPhone applications using Java? (From: Rob Ross <email@hidden>)
 >Re: Can I develop iPhone applications using Java? (From: "Ronald C.F. Antony" <email@hidden>)



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